637: Benefits

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There are advantages to living in a small town. Wonderful, affirming advantages.

There are also issues. One of those is the stranglehold a large employer has on the people who make up their current employees and their potential workforce.

See, in a larger metropolis, employees who are treated unfairly or just don’t feel appreciated for whatever reason, those employees can vote with their feet and take a different job with another company, generally without a huge amount of disruption to their lives. Many don’t even have to move their households to change jobs. As a result, some employers understand about treating their employees fairly, since they know the people have choices. At the same time, there is a correspondingly larger pool of employee candidates in a larger town, too, so maybe that advantage actually is a wash when all is said and done.

However, in a smaller town, a large employer is much more impervious to treating employees fairly because they know they are one of the few places anywhere around that has the pay and benefits people need to survive in this modern age. If an employee isn’t happy, they often are forced to suck it up, knowing that they will have to move their families and sell their homes to be able to relocate somewhere that has equivalent pay and benefits compared to the job they now hold with the abusive employer. This prospect is fairly risky, and many play it safe (throwing no rocks, here – I totally understand) and put up with being abused on the job, because it can be expensive to relocate – and it is certainly stressful to most people. I understand about needing a job, but at what cost?

Management has to get pretty obviously lousy to even casual observers before enough employees begin to lose their fear of the costs of calling it quits, and stand up for their rights, or just pack it in and say to hell with it, and get the heck out of Dodge.

I have been blessed in this employment department on several counts. First, I am a preacher’s daughter and for my dad, that was akin to being a military brat – we moved every year or so. I learned not to get attached to a house, or a geographic location, for that matter. It does not freak me out to move. I know I can land on my feet and be pretty content nearly anywhere.

The second advantage I have is that my career preparation happens to be a fairly unusual one that just happens to be in high demand in my part of the world, and indeed, pretty much the entire world over. I have always known that if I got fired today, I could pretty much be working tomorrow in SEVERAL locations not too far away, or as far away as I chose to go. Not everyone else has that security. Plus, I discovered that I can make a go of it even if I decide to leave the country again, so even if I were to be blackballed (yes, that does happen), I could still quite easily be hired overseas, because I am good at what I do, and I know it. That is also pretty liberating, and also something most others are unwilling to contemplate to escape an abusive employer.

They’d rather be abused, and stay where they are. Change is scary. It is also liberating, and full of infinite possibilities for a better life. Sometimes counting the cost costs too much. Be willing to take a chance.

Consider all the things that can go RIGHT, for once.

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636: Don’t

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Don’t speak to me of problems – I live them daily.

Possibilities are what I need to hear.

Don’t talk about frustrations – work to solve them

Create a possible solution, and try it on for size.

Don’t tell me what’s wrong.

Show me instead what is right.

And if you can’t do that….just don’t.

I’ve got all I can handle already.

625: Not Perfect

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I am not perfect. That is why I am Christian. I know full well I am not perfect, and that I need my God and a church family to help me be a better person than I would probably be left to my own devices. I need encouragement, I like being useful to others, I like helping out with activities and outreach. I need Christian accountability in the same way an alcoholic needs AA – when I am out of fellowship, I slide into sometimes destructive behaviors and ways of thinking that are not always uplifting and wholesome. I don’t want to focus on the problems, but instead – the possibilities. That’s not who I want to be, that negative person – so I attend, where I am in community with others who want to be reminded of all the good things we can do in love, and who we can be following the greatest example I can find. Church goers aren’t attending a saint’s club, but instead, a hospital for sinners who are looking for and wanting a better way. That’s a good church.

If I was a perfect person, I would not need a church family, or God, for that matter. I could be out enjoying my Sundays with all the other perfect people who don’t feel the need to attend. Why do perfect people need anybody or anything else?

What I am is trying to be better today than I was yesterday. I am not perfect, and don’t pretend to be.

503: On the Edge

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I stand on the edge. I am enjoying the limitless view of the (potential) landscape presented by this cliff face. I hiked up here, slogging through defeat, failure, misery, fatigue, worry, broken relationships, wasted and unfulfilled promises, and finally, through the healing, to make it to this summit – this cliff face, this decision.

I can see, clearly, the possibilities that await the leap. I have decided to do it. I will jump, abandoning safety for the possibility of finally achieving what I have sought all along. The decision already has been made. It will happen, unless something outside my power occurs to stop it.

I have only to wait until the time is right. Impatiently, though trying to be patient.

Three months, two weeks. Hold on – the leap is coming!